Aides worry about Trump’s personal safety and strong rhetoric if he visits North Korea’s border

Trump is visiting South Korea in November, and his aides are worried. Some fear Trump may say something escalatory. Some fear Trump would be in danger standing so close to armed North Koreans. Ahead of President Donald Trump’s planned trip to South Korea in November, advisers on both sides are debating if Trump should head to North Korea’s border, where some fear he could escalate the crisis or even come into personal danger. South Korean officials fear that Trump could again say something inflammatory to increase tensions with North Korea, but other advisers worry about Trump’s personal safety, according to the Washington Post. The demilitarized zone between South and North… Read More

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Obama Back On Campaign Trail Stumping For Dem Gov. Candidates

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Barack Obama is returning to the campaign trail to stump for Democratic gubernatorial candidates in New Jersey and Virginia as they gear up for next month’s elections. Thursday’s events mark the first time the former president is stepping back into the political spotlight since leaving the White House. Unlike more low-key appearances earlier this year, Obama’s foray into two states won’t be a one-and-done. He is planning more public appearances as the year closes, and preparation for the 2018 midterm elections begins. “Obama seems to be determined to be an engaged and active former president who’s playing a role in different issues and is involved… Read More

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Under Fire, POTUS Defends Call To Soldier’s Grieving Family

MIAMI (AP) — President Donald Trump emphatically rejected claims Wednesday that he was disrespectful to the grieving family of a slain soldier, as the firestorm he ignited over his assertions of empathy for American service members spread into a third contentious day. “I have proof,” he insisted. The controversy over how Trump has conducted one of the most sacred of presidential tasks generated new turmoil in the White House. After one slain soldier’s father accused the president of going back on a promise to send a check for $25,000, the White House said the money had been sent. Chief of staff John Kelly, a retired Marine general whose son was… Read More

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Even opponents of a Denver initiative say green roofs are laudable, but is a mandate the right approach?

A Denver initiative on the November ballot seeks to sprout more trees, shrubs and even vegetable gardens atop larger buildings across the city, a move that would accelerate a trend that has been embraced by some developers. But by proposing a mandate on so-called “green roofs” that in some ways would stand as the nation’s most stringent — leapfrogging San Francisco — the local environmental activists behind the Denver Green Roof Initiative could be taking a gamble on Denver voters, observers say. The tension between the clear environmental benefits of rooftop gardens and an aversion by some voters to wide-ranging government requirements was clear in a recent comment by Denver… Read More

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China Has A Glass Ceiling Too — And Here’s Why It Won’t Be Shattered Anytime Soon

Lintao Zhang / Getty Images BEIJING — China is embarking on its twice-a-decade senior leadership shuffle this week, but once again, not a single woman is expected to ascend to a top leadership role in the country. Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen and Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam have broken barriers for women, but in mainland China, where patronage ties are crucial to securing top positions in government and the culture remains heavily patriarchal, aspiring female politicians are hitting a glass ceiling. Though slightly more female delegates have been selected to the 19th Party Congress — the ruling Communist party meeting taking place this week — advocates for women’s rights… Read More

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